The most valuable skill you’ll need: Resilience

woman with balloons
We know for a fact that life from time to time is going to be hard and difficult. Since failure and pain are inevitable experiences, I firmly believe that the number one skill a person should invest on is resilience, meaning the ability to bounce back from difficulties. Resilience is a component of emotional intelligence and contributes to both personal and professional development. No matter how smart and capable you are under normal conditions, the conditions won’t always be normal, so resilience will help you adapt. Especially nowadays in our competitive and fast paced world those who can’t respond to challenges will be stagnant. Continue reading

8 Best Books on Spirituality

You know this state of mind when the New Year approaches and you find your thoughts wandering around existential inquiries such as who I am, where I am heading to or if I am mindful enough? I’ve got that, too. At times like this I tend to turn my energy inwards and reflect upon self improvement, but hopefully there have been books on my way that captivated me both with their narrative and their insights on spirituality. All of them, even though they represent diverse approaches, have influenced my mindset and led me to inspiring revelations about myself and the world around me.


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Irvin D. Yalom: An Introduction

Yalom

I was profoundly excited to find out that there is a new movie coming soon about Irvin Yalom. On the occasion of Sabine Gisiger’s movie “Yalom’s Cure”, I would like to share with you some tidbits about one of the most influential personalities in psychotherapy. Irvin Yalom is a man of many qualities: an American psychiatrist, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at Stanford University and a bestselling author of numerous fiction but also non fiction books.

What I appreciate about him and makes me devour his books is that many of them are categorised as “psychology novels”. In other words, he writes fiction combined with psychology and frequently philosophy. “I’ve often found fictional characters to be more real than historical characters”, he states. His writings are approachable, with minimun techical vocabulary or jargon words,humorous at times, thus making even difficult psychology concepts understood by almost everyone. Continue reading

Life lessons from Sylvia

SylviaPlath

What I grasp as piece of advice from Sylvia Plath, the American poet who repeatedly courted death. According to Aristotle: “There was never a genius without a tincture of madness”. Sylvia was a prominent artist but became widely known because of her dramatic suicide. A failed marriage with Ted Hughes and an absent relationship with her father were her major wounds, which she mourned for at her poetry. Still, she managed to impose herself in a male-dominated society and  highlight the female writing voice. Even though Sylvia has concerned psychologists due to her depressive frame of mind, some of her words are worth remembering while on the skids. Continue reading